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quest4kickflip
05-31-2011, 03:11 PM
Hi, I'm a student currently studying for an exam that covers a cursory of Dreamweaver skills. The exam prep guide recommends that we have answers to the following questions. I would greatly appreciate it if any errors in my answers could be corrected. Here are the questions, with their respective answers following:



How do you validate markup in DW, & why is it important to do so?

Select File > Check Page > Validate (As XML). In the Validation panel that appears, view the “Settings” to make sure the relevant document type declaration is selected to check against. Now in the Validation panel select “Validate Current Document”. Dreamweaver will display the validation results, identifying errors or indicating that there are none. By fixing any errors identified in the results, markup is validated. Validating markup is useful because it ensures that a page will display consistently between different browsers, and that your page will trigger quirks mode when necessary.



How are HTML and CSS dissimilar, & how is CSS advantageous in certain cases?

HTML codes to build a site’s structure and content; CSS is ideal for presentation. HTML can handle presentation, but CSS is useful because it’s a more efficient means of doing so. Managing a site’s appearance with CSS rather than HTML also makes it more compatible for exporting to other viewing mediums (e.g. mobile devices); and leaves the HTML code simpler to read for search engine-indexing spiders, thereby maximizing SEO.


Any corrections or confirmations would be much appreciated.


-Thanks,
Ed

johnMoss
05-31-2011, 06:52 PM
You can add a comment in the second paragraph about how css simplifies the design process by creating classes which will function (and institute changes) site-wide by manipulating just one element instead of all pages...

domedia
06-01-2011, 02:18 PM
Any corrections or confirmations would be much appreciated.
If you understood what that all means, you're good :)


You can add a comment in the second paragraph about how css simplifies the design process by creating classes which will function (and institute changes) site-wide by manipulating just one element instead of all pages...
That's just one way of creating a selector. If so, I would mention the CSS ID's (#container), pseudo elements (:first-child), attribute selectors (p[title="hello"]) and just regular elements (p) ++ but I don't really see it's needed for the question if you're able to show you understand the concept behind HTML and CSS.

johnMoss
06-01-2011, 02:55 PM
He used the word cursory in his opening sentence so I'm assuming very rounded commentary is sought. But yours gets him the A+.