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JFK
11-18-2009, 08:01 AM
Hello,

I am due to start a job teaching Dreamweaver shortly.

It will be a 2 hour lesson a week to new users and a 1 hour lesson a week to users with some knowledge of Dreamweaver.

I've got my ideas for what I would like to cover but was wondering if anyone else had any experience of this and things I should consider and the best ways to approach it.

Many thanks!

DWcourse
11-18-2009, 01:51 PM
I always start out with defining the local and remote site (I make sure students have some server space since I don't think it's designing a website unless you also learn how to upload it).
Next comes basic HTML and the limited styling that comes with it.
CSS layout using the built-in CSS page layouts.
Working with images (with a lot of attention to Photoshop Smart Objects if you have CS4)
Working with Dreamweaver templates
CSS menus (1-level menu from scratch) and Spry menubars
Behaviors and Widgets
Tables for tabular data (with Spry dataset?)
FormsAlong the way I'm constantly introducing new CSS and reinforcing the CSS they've already learned. I teach primarily visual editing but emphasize the importance of understanding HTML and CSS and recommend using Split View to see the code changes.

Finally, at least in the first part of a class, we are each building a copy of the same site so everyone can follow my step-by-step instructions and explanations. Somewhere around item 5 or 6 above, I encorage them to also begin working on their own, custom sites.

Ricky55
11-19-2009, 08:48 PM
I do a bit of teaching and I use Lynda.com as a basis.

Check out one of their Dreamweaver courses, you should know you're covering everything that way.

http://www.lynda.com/home/ViewCourses.aspx?lpk0=364

JFK
12-08-2009, 07:03 AM
Thanks people.

Don't suppose anyone has done or knows of a multiple choice text/quiz on Dreamweaver?

I'm rather stumped about what kind of things to put in it.

It is to test the students knowledge on using Dreamweaver.

Thanks.

edbr
12-08-2009, 07:25 AM
I'm rather stumped about what kind of things to put in it.
seriously? i hope your students are not reading this , it might worry them a bit

JFK
12-08-2009, 07:42 AM
Haha! I meant I'm not sure how best to write a paper test about using a computer package.

All I can think of are things like 'What would you click to insert a table/image/etc?'.

Not really very inspiring for a test. I don't want to test their memory of the layout of Dreamweaver as it's rather pointless as it is easier to remember when sitting at the computer compared to when sitting at a desk with a sheet of paper and a pen so it doesnt really tell you much.

edbr
12-08-2009, 08:04 AM
ah and if they answer
'What would you click to insert a table/image/etc?'
i would insert a table... you can give the detention and fail them :)

Corrosive
12-08-2009, 08:25 AM
Why not give them a practical test? 'Build me a three column layout with CSS and with XXX styles'.

JFK
12-08-2009, 11:23 AM
I wish I could but it has already been set that they do a paper quiz type test.

Corrosive
12-08-2009, 11:39 AM
I can only speak for the UK but this is what is fundamentally wrong with education. Just because a kid can tell you the significant dates of the second world war 'parrot fashion' doesn't mean that they have a wider appreciation of the conflict.

Same way that a 'multiple guess' test won't prove an understanding of Dreamweaver or web design...

...Right, off soap box now ;)

If I think of any questions, I'll post them back for you.

DWcourse
12-08-2009, 01:47 PM
Well, I'd at least include some questions about HTML and basic CSS and maybe some questions about why you might use something like:

To align an image to the right of the layout, use:
a. The CSS float property.
b. Epoxy glue

And, this pdf from Adobe has a few trial questions in it:

http://partners.adobe.com/public/en/ace/ACE_Exam_Guide_DreamweaverCS4.pdf

DWcourse
12-08-2009, 01:49 PM
I can only speak for the UK but this is what is fundamentally wrong with education. Just because a kid can tell you the significant dates of the second world war 'parrot fashion' doesn't mean that they have a wider appreciation of the conflict.

Same way that a 'multiple guess' test won't prove an understanding of Dreamweaver or web design...

...Right, off soap box now ;)

If I think of any questions, I'll post them back for you.

Amen! (from the U.S.)

Corrosive
12-08-2009, 02:53 PM
Amen! (from the U.S.)

Thought that might be the case but didn't want to speak for you guys.

DWcourse
12-08-2009, 03:04 PM
<rant>I hate to go too far off-topic but I taught a supposedly "advanced" web design course at the college level once. The students all had a previous semester of "web design" and all they had done was export slices from Photoshop. And they had never uploaded a page to a server!

I check the local university's Art & Design program two years ago and the only web design they offered was as part of a digital survey course: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver in 16 weeks (I can't remember is Flash was included). Hopefully things have improved but I doubt that they have much.

They expect a student to spend a couple years learning how to mix oils and handle a brush but they set the same student down at a computer, offer him a survey course and say, "go to it." Of course the students already know more about digital media than most of the profs.</rant>

domedia
12-08-2009, 05:28 PM
First of all, having a written test for Dreamweaver is not a good idea imho. But if that decision is already made I would base the questions on what the course has been about. If it's only been on the software on not HTML/CSS/JS then it's hard to get away from questions like "Explain how you define a site'. But if the course has been designed around the protocols and standards of making websites, then you can have questions that would more test their knowledge of making websites, like "What is the role of HTML?", "How would you mark up a list of items" etc. Basically test the student sin what they've been taught.

Then I want to join DWCourse's rant..
A little off topic, but but I like the topic :)
I've seen some horrible stuff thought in smaller colleges. Even tests from Dreamweaver courses where it's obvious the teacher wasn't even sure of web standards, but more so didn't even understand Dreamweaver. The quality is all over the place, and I think this is because this line of work is still new. A smaller educational institution feel the need for a 'web design' course, but has no way of knowing what is required of who is going to tech it. So often they find a local 'web-duh-signer' or just asks the guy that teaches C++ if he can do it..

It hasn't been until recently that anyone has tried to put together some standard curriculum.

Opera has done a great job making a base curriculum that anyone can use:
http://www.opera.com/company/education/curriculum/

The Web Standards Project (WASP) has also put together something:
http://interact.webstandards.org/

I saw WASP present their stuff about a year ago, and Molly (http://molly.com/) basically told everyone to stop bitching and start dong something about the situation: If you pass a small local educational institution on your way to work, stop by and talk to the guy teaching web stuff. Offer your help and together we can help graduate students with a better toolset 8)

Corrosive
12-08-2009, 05:35 PM
I saw WASP present their stuff about a year ago

http://www.truemetal.org/metalheart/images/wasp/Band10.jpg

Sorry, we were off topic anyway so couldn't resist.

I agree wholeheartedly with the sentiments here though. good rants chaps :)