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View Full Version : Workflow? Creating a main index page and sub pages


liljuvu73
07-31-2009, 03:44 PM
I have finally decided to bite the bullet and re-do our company web site in html.

At the moment our site is completely in flash, it has a main index page that loads in all sub pages.

Can anyone let me know what the general design principle in dreamweaver is.

Do i simply create a main index page with default headers and footers and then create separate simpler html pages for the content, and then load them into the main index page.

If this is correct can anyone give a rough explanation of how this is done, or give me some keywords or links that are worth researching.

James

http://www.omega-completion.com

Corrosive
07-31-2009, 03:51 PM
OK, you have two choices. Templates or includes;

http://www.dreamweaverclub.com/dreamweaver-templates.php
http://www.dreamweaverclub.com/php-includes.php

Read both of these and see what you fancy.

DWcourse
07-31-2009, 03:58 PM
A third choice might be templates AND includes.

Template the overall design and use includes within the template for areas that may need to be updated site-wide on a regular basis like the navigation menu and the copyright notice.

liljuvu73
07-31-2009, 04:51 PM
thanks for your help guys, its appreciated.

James

maartenvr
08-02-2009, 02:08 AM
Good call to go to HTML instead.

I would make sure that all file extensions are .php and not .html. It gives you more flexibility, even if you are not planning on using PHP includes.

Nice website btw :)

liljuvu73
08-02-2009, 05:57 PM
Good call to go to HTML instead.

I would make sure that all file extensions are .php and not .html. It gives you more flexibility, even if you are not planning on using PHP includes.

Nice website btw :)

Thanks for your advice guys I have got the template principal sussed now.

Can you explain the advantage of PHP over HTML.

Im a bit clueless.

Thanks again

domedia
08-02-2009, 06:09 PM
If you want to use the server side language PHP for your website, the file extensions would normally be PHP. There are other server side languages and PHP might not be what you're looking for.

If you're just starting to understand HTML/CSS/JS you're probably good with just regular HTML pages for now. There is no reason to parse all pages through PHP when the pages are just simply HTML pages.

If you plan to use PHP in the near future, you might save yourself some time. But if you're not really sure what PHP is at this point, forget about it.

liljuvu73
08-02-2009, 06:29 PM
If you want to use the server side language PHP for your website, the file extensions would normally be PHP. There are other server side languages and PHP might not be what you're looking for.

If you're just starting to understand HTML/CSS/JS you're probably good with just regular HTML pages for now. There is no reason to parse all pages through PHP when the pages are just simply HTML pages.

If you plan to use PHP in the near future, you might save yourself some time. But if you're not really sure what PHP is at this point, forget about it.

Thanks for your help :)

maartenvr
08-03-2009, 03:07 AM
There is no reason to parse all pages through PHP when the pages are just simply HTML pages.

If you plan to use PHP in the near future, you might save yourself some time. But if you're not really sure what PHP is at this point, forget about it.
Right, it will save time. As there is no difference between having a .php or .html extension when using plain HTML. you may as well use the .php extension, to not only save time in the future, but also eliminate the chance of losing your indexed pages when switching to PHP.

DWcourse
08-04-2009, 12:26 AM
Of course that's assuming that php is what you'll be switching to.

In any case you can usually configure the server to parse .htm or .html as php.