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Hunter86
02-09-2009, 01:56 PM
Hello,
I am quite the amateur still in web design and I find there are so many things to do and work a rounds to implement for our friends in the IE family( mainly).
Now I have started this post as I am just after a bit of advice from people with a bit more experience then myself.
I find that designing a site to display as intended across the browser platform board is very difficult, if not near impossible. I find it achievable to get a satisfactory layout but just not perfect, is that the case, is that how it works, or does this show my inexperience or bad mark-up/css skills?
Do other designers find it a challenge? Or is it normal for your design to differ slightly across the board. I know fonts and text rendering does differ but what about float positions actual element layout.
Example my site Iím trying to put together MYP-uk.com Iím getting there but I find that it differs so much between IE6 IE7 FF3 and Safari. example the number logo in a floated div in a floated container inside the header just is not right in IE6 I have placed padding and margin (which I think would stop any margin collapse) I have set the floats to display: inline so no margins are doubled, no fix. is this to-do with the order of this div in the source? Or is this my poor mark-up i just try so many things and before I know it my css is a mess. Any ideas on whatís doing this or what is the correct way I should of done it
Another issue I find is that on my hosting page I have a support block advert that has a margin that is displayed correctly in FF Safari IE6, but its not there at all in IE7? again I thought that putting padding and margin on its container element would stop margin collapse (if thatís what the problem is)also the contact us button is different across all browsers again is this a result of how I have chosen to code it or is this normal behaviour? Do people use invisible floats and div block to assist in layouts? Is a good idea to use different css files for different browsers or conditional statements to achieve the goals desire? I thought that it is best practise to get solid design across the browser platforms or is that just wishing far too much?
Basically is what I experience something every designer does or am I really poor at what Iím doing with poor understanding what I am doing or am I just going through the steps everyone else has? You can read book after book and tutorial after tutorial but its not the same as speaking to an experienced designer and just having their input on the problems and thoughts that I have maybe just to say look your got it totally wrong now go read another book lol or no your just experiencing what we all doo you just have to tackle it and learn the tricks of the trade as it were
I hope some of you can relate to this post or find it an interesting read.
thanks
Dan

domedia
02-09-2009, 03:11 PM
I find that designing a site to display as intended across the browser platform board is very difficult, if not near impossible. It's just a matter of knowledge. People that do this for a living does not have this issue.
I find it achievable to get a satisfactory layout but just not perfect, is that the case, is that how it works, or does this show my inexperience or bad mark-up/css skills? I think it just means that you have a little more to learn :)
Do other designers find it a challenge? Everyone has had to go through the challenge learn how tom make layouts look the same across browsers, it's normal.
Or is it normal for your design to differ slightly across the board. I know fonts and text rendering does differ but what about float positions actual element layout. Many developers would explain that the web is not paper, and it's not supposed to look the same across all platforms/devices/browsers. The problem, usually, is to sell the client on this idea.
<snip>Any ideas on whatís doing this or what is the correct way I should of done it I would post specific threads for specific issues, makes it a whole lot easier.
Do people use invisible floats and div block to assist in layouts? I have no idea what you're talking about here... but it sounds like you're trying to use the markup for design purposes, it's not what it's meant for.
Is a good idea to use different css files for different browsers or conditional statements to achieve the goals desire? Depends on how you want to organize and maintain your code. I find that I'm able to writ one CSS file that works in all target browsers.
I thought that it is best practise to get solid design across the browser platforms or is that just wishing far too much? I think that sounds like a good practice.
Basically is what I experience something every designer does or am I really poor at what Iím doing with poor understanding what I am doing or am I just going through the steps everyone else has? Everyone has to crawl before they can walk. I would just keep hacking away. But it also really helps if you're able to organize your thoughts a little. It looks like you've just started writing what you're thinking in this thread :) Ask concise questions and organize your thoughts before posting, that helps :)

You can read book after book and tutorial after tutorial but its not the same as speaking to an experienced designer and just having their input on the problems and thoughts that I have maybe just to say look your got it totally wrong now go read another book lol or no your just experiencing what we all doo you just have to tackle it and learn the tricks of the trade as it were I think it depends on the book. The best advice and lessons I've gotten has been from well prepared books.

Ricky55
02-09-2009, 03:33 PM
Your just thinking what nearly every one thinks when you start anything not just web design, at least you care about the results which means in the end you'll get there. That's the great thing about web design I think, its an ever moving evolving target and no matter how much you learn there's always something new to learn.

You'll never get a page looking identical across all browsers it just doesn't work like that but you should be able to get something like.

As Dom suggested you'd be better posting an example to show us and then we could say if its the browsers or just you..

Only joking, even if it is something you've got slightly wrong will make sure you know how to put it right.

CSS can be one of the most hair pulling things to learn I think, although on the surface it seems easy to understand, its the bugs and browser inconsistencies that make it difficult. If I'm ever struggling I always just have a break, go make a cup of tea and then come back to it and usually then I see straight away what I was doing wrong.

I would also recommend a Lynda.com course CSS for designers, if you sit through that you'll give yourself a good start.

Hunter86
02-09-2009, 04:08 PM
Thanks Guys its good to get a response from you both. i have a collection of sitepoint books that i am getting stuck into but it is one of those things that takes time. I will check lynda out too as i have a collection of tuts from there. Look out for my other posts lol
thanks again
Dan

Corrosive
02-09-2009, 04:14 PM
If I'm ever struggling I always just have a break, go make a cup of tea

The British answer to just about anything. With you 110% fella :)