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View Full Version : font size & color (using HTML) in CS4


craigr
12-22-2008, 05:34 AM
In Dreamweaver CS4, is it possible to assign font size and font color easily by using HTML tags, without hand-coding the HTML?
In earlier versions of DW this was easy to do, but in CS4 these editing features have been removed from the Properties Panel.

edbr
12-22-2008, 06:44 AM
click the css tab in properties

craigr
12-22-2008, 03:15 PM
edbr says, "click the css tab"
_____But this was my question: "is it possible to assign font size and font color [and paragraph centering, etc] easily by using HTML tags, without hand-coding the HTML?"
_____Why? Here is my situation: I'm not making a new website. Instead, I already have a website with 400 HTML pages based on 10 dwt-templates. I want to use my time to develop the CONTENT of these pages (plus a few new ones I'll make) instead of learning CSS and converting the FORMAT from HTML to CSS. I'm using DW 6.1 (from 2002) and it works OK with one exception -- it won't synchronize files between my hard drive and the server, and this was a major reason I bought CS4.

_____So, is there any way to edit HTML tags (for size, color, left/center, etc) in CS4 as-it-is, or with a plug-in?
_____I've heard that CS3 still supported full HTML editing. Is this true? If yes, does Adobe offer a way to get a downgrade to DW-CS3, since I already bought their new "improved" CS4, or will I have to find another way to get it? Or maybe I'll continue to edit pages using DW-MX (version 6.1) and only use CS4 to synchronize my hard drive and server.

d a v e
12-22-2008, 03:51 PM
that might be your question but the answer is css. it's been out now for over 10 years so, to be blunt, it's about time your learnt.

if you're not prepared to learn and your software doesn't do what you want then you may have to pay for someone to recode your site to standards or simply be remain disappointed :)

Ricky55
12-22-2008, 04:47 PM
Dave's right, setting up styles in the CSS panel is simple anyway

Kelon
12-22-2008, 08:29 PM
Agree with the guys above I'm afraid - you see css will target your html in one sentence as in "make all p tags blue, helvetica and 1.5em tall".. though written in a great shorthand called css. Dreamweaver's brilliant for css editing to really make your html sing. Go for it, you'll love it. Best of luck, lots of stuff online including 'simple' guides - great word to use in search engines I find.

kenroar
02-26-2009, 05:34 PM
OK, let me make sure I understand you correctly. One of the websites I work on was done in good old HTML. It has about 4,000 pages. Some sections on this site have different fonts and formatting. You are suggesting I go back, spend weeks of time and create CSS for all 4,000 pages just because I "should" be?

Please demonstrate to me why it is a good idea that I should be wasting weeks of my time converting old files to CSS. I agree that CSS is the language of the future- but what about people who are still maintaining sites done in HTML?

that might be your question but the answer is css. it's been out now for over 10 years so, to be blunt, it's about time your learnt.

if you're not prepared to learn and your software doesn't do what you want then you may have to pay for someone to recode your site to standards or simply be remain disappointed :)

d a v e
02-26-2009, 06:13 PM
"I agree that CSS is the language of the future"

css is the language from about 11 years ago.

if you can't afford the time to change then i would suggest using css for any *additional* content you have and let the old html tags remain.

if you want to change all the old contents appearance then you may have to resort to find and replace - after backing up your site.

you might 'waste' weeks of your time converting to css but then you won't be in this mess next time you want to make sitewide changes.

i'm not going to even ask if you're using tables for layout (and i bet they're not even controlled by css either ;)
it's not up to us to demonstrate why it's a good idea to converting to css if you're not interested in hearing. i'm sorry you have a site that - like many others - is still in deprecated html but at some point you're going to have to change: when you do this is in your hands.

why don't you also just stick with your older version of dreamweaver and simply ftp with something like filezilla?

edbr
02-27-2009, 12:13 AM
same answer click css, then highliht the element click edit rule and yu then select class,tag whatever you want.

regarding css you only have to edit 10 pages (templates) so iy you make changes use a seperate css sheet and link all 10 templates to that sheet . its a start and wont involve weeks of work just a short time to get you started.

domedia
02-27-2009, 02:14 AM
In the HTML specs, all styling are moved to CSS. So the answer to your question is 'no'.

This is a huge improvement. You change the design of your 400 pages in seconds, by only editing one file, the CSS file. By using a CSS file, you can exclusively develop your content without having to add any colors or sizes or worry about styling. It will be done automatically from the CSS file you already have in place.

This is a separation of content and style which should benefit you greatly.

kenroar
02-27-2009, 05:06 AM
The site began in 1994, so it was in the early days of the WWW. I only wish then that I had templates and CSS. It would have made it easier to add on to the site. Now it is several thousand pages. I use both CSS and HTML tables. I learned to hand-code html before web page editors came out, so I can do the HTML tables very quickly. Although CSS has been out for 10 years, it did not gain much acceptance until about 5 years ago. The issue here is that Adobe should allow as much flexibility with their programs as possible. If you have people who are transitioning to CSS and still need to do a few pages in html, why not accommodate them?

"I agree that CSS is the language of the future"

css is the language from about 11 years ago.

if you can't afford the time to change then i would suggest using css for any *additional* content you have and let the old html tags remain.

if you want to change all the old contents appearance then you may have to resort to find and replace - after backing up your site.

you might 'waste' weeks of your time converting to css but then you won't be in this mess next time you want to make sitewide changes.

i'm not going to even ask if you're using tables for layout (and i bet they're not even controlled by css either ;)
it's not up to us to demonstrate why it's a good idea to converting to css if you're not interested in hearing. i'm sorry you have a site that - like many others - is still in deprecated html but at some point you're going to have to change: when you do this is in your hands.

why don't you also just stick with your older version of dreamweaver and simply ftp with something like filezilla?

edbr
02-27-2009, 05:19 AM
progress basically. there is no more support for windows 95 either. and not much call for experience with side valve engines in the automotive trade.
If you have people who are transitioning to CSS and still need to do a few pages in html, why not accommodate them?

kenroar
02-27-2009, 05:45 AM
This will be my last post. Obviously people are going to be in disagreement here. Using your analogy, we need to trash all the antique cars in the world because valve engines should not be maintained any longer. Progress, after all, right?

progress basically. there is no more support for windows 95 either. and not much call for experience with side valve engines in the automotive trade.
If you have people who are transitioning to CSS and still need to do a few pages in html, why not accommodate them?

edbr
02-27-2009, 06:10 AM
maintain them if you will , but dont expect them to be as efficient as newer models, for die hard enthusiasts

Nightcrawler
03-06-2009, 05:01 AM
Sorry.......

d a v e
03-06-2009, 11:21 AM
Sorry.......
for what? ?

lfobarri
07-21-2009, 09:07 AM
I agree that every one should use CSS. But for NEW sites. Or for REDESIGN sites.

For that old site, when all you want is just change a color or font of ONE word, it is a huge mistake from Adobe not letting people do with HTML as old versions.

It is not even democratic. Also, it is not fair with loyal people that use Dreamweaver for years.

Just because this loyal people should learn CSS? It is also a mean strategy.

I hope Adobe fix this for next version. Really desappointing.

It is not a good marketing. "Let our customer suffer. We know what is better for them. We dont want to hear them."

....

DWcourse
07-21-2009, 01:43 PM
Actually I think it was a bold and excellent move by Adobe to quit supporting deprecated HTML tags. After all:

If you don't want to use CSS, you don't have to upgrade.
If you make it easy for people to continue their old bad habits, they will. It's not mean to make people do it right. It's "tough love."
Find and Replace now includes functionality to strip tags and attributes. With a little thought and planning I would think it would be easier to convert to CSS than hunting down and editing hundreds (thousands?) of html attributes.
It's not about democracy it's about the market place of ideas and in that marketplace CSS is the winner.

domedia
07-21-2009, 05:05 PM
Welcome to the forum lfobarri :)

I agree that every one should use CSS. But for NEW sites. Or for REDESIGN sites.Why can't you use CSS on existing websites? It's just as good for new sites as for old sites.

It is not even democratic.
Democracy has nothing to do with software 8-)


Just because this loyal people should learn CSS? It is also a mean strategy. CSS2 was final in '98 and since around 2000/2001 there has been a broad shift in front end web development towards web standards. In all honesty, if you're not using CSS yet (I assume you've been doing this for a while), this might not be for you.

joeKing
08-03-2009, 08:38 PM
Would be nice if Adobe left it up to the user. I'm working on an email blast template. And certain email programs don't support CSS too well. A rarely used program called MS Outlook, for example.

Really bites that they changed how you can format code. Now I have to do it all by hand.

JK

DWcourse
08-03-2009, 11:28 PM
Don't tell anyone I told you this:

Using the font tag in Dreamweaver CS4Ö (http://dwcourse.com/dreamweaver/font-tag-dreamweaver-cs4.php)

stephensmith
08-07-2009, 02:53 PM
Thanks JC. Iím going to try your workaround for using the font tag. I just moved from DW8 to DW CS4 and was thinking I was crazy because for the life of me I couldnít figure out how to change font size in CS4. I understand CSS somewhat, but it doesnít make sense (to me, anyway) to have to create a new CSS class or ID every time I just want to change the size of one word.