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Interstellar Icon
05-29-2008, 05:46 AM
Hi Everyone,

I recently did a site redesign, and I'd like some feedback on it from as many of you that are willing to provide it. :-D Here's the URL:

http://www.mungoosewax.com/

I'm brand new to web design, and pretty much self taught, so I'm looking for any feedback that will help me hone my craft. Pretty much the good, the bad, and the ugly! ;-)

Thanks in advance,
Sam

pete
05-29-2008, 08:42 AM
You say you are brand new to web design so therefore I would say you have done a very good job indeed. It is clean, easy navigation, not confusing and does what it sets out to do.

It doesn't validate http://validator.w3.org/check?verbose=1&uri=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mungoosewax.com%2Fproducts.ht ml but considering your newbie status I don't think anyone can be too critical of that.

You have also used loads of   in the footer which is pointless but I am guessing you don't yet know it is better to use padding and margins. These are technical issues that don't affect the site design.

For a newbie you should be proud of what you have done :)

Andromeda
05-29-2008, 09:26 AM
Yep. Looks good from down here. As Pete said, clean, easy navigation, not confusing and does what it's supposed to do. Nice uncluttered site and all the links work well.

Ricky55
05-29-2008, 10:59 AM
Not a bad design for a first attempt.

Just one thing, when you click to buy something you link to Paypal, this is ok for a small store but I wouldn't have Paypal replace your site I would have Paypal open in a new browser window. From a usability point of view its not very reassuring when your site just disappears!

Interstellar Icon
05-30-2008, 08:08 AM
Hey All,

Thanks very much for taking the time to review the site and provide input. :grin: Some thoughts on your thoughts...


It doesn't validate http://validator.w3.org/check?verbose=1&uri=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mungoosewax.com%2Fproducts.ht ml but considering your newbie status I don't think anyone can be too critical of that.


Ultimately, I'd like the sites I design to be w3c valid, but I've read in more than one place that it's not all that important, and that a lot of the biggest sites on the Internet are not. Is there a specific reason that a site should be w3c valid, or does it just represent good design in general?


You have also used loads of   in the footer which is pointless but I am guessing you don't yet know it is better to use padding and margins. These are technical issues that don't affect the site design.


I'm sure that my code sucks. :lol: Next up is learning CSS, which I believe should resolve these types of issues. If I'm oversimplifying and there's something else I should put on the slate, as well, please let me know.

Not a bad design for a first attempt.

Just one thing, when you click to buy something you link to Paypal, this is ok for a small store but I wouldn't have Paypal replace your site I would have Paypal open in a new browser window. From a usability point of view its not very reassuring when your site just disappears!

The original design of the site had PayPal opening in a new window, but the designer didn't code for the 'Continue Shopping' button, so users had to manually close the PayPal window and go back to the Mungoose order page. I've since discovered that it's possible to code the 'Continue Shopping' button to automatically close the PayPal window and return to the Mungoose order page. Would this be the proper setup for this site?

One last question: I read in a forum that it's important to include text links at the bottom of web pages (for users whose browsers don't display images), but I've since noticed that most of the bigger sites don't have them, and also that alt text would inform the users of the image links' content. From a "best practices" design standpoint, is it still a good idea to include these links, or are they now redundant?

Thanks again for your time and input - I really appreciate it. 8)

Sam

pete
05-30-2008, 08:42 AM
Ultimately, I'd like the sites I design to be w3c valid, but I've read in more than one place that it's not all that important, and that a lot of the biggest sites on the Internet are not. Is there a specific reason that a site should be w3c valid, or does it just represent good design in general?

http://validator.w3.org/docs/why.html

http://webdesign.about.com/od/htmlvalidators/a/aa092799.htm

http://www.totalvalidator.com/blogs/2005/08/top-3-reasons-to-validate-your-website.html

If you ever write javascript you will soon validate all your pages, try appending elements to a parent element when that parent element is malformed, you will spend endless hours wondering why your scripts fail.

Corrosive
05-30-2008, 10:27 AM
For a newbie you should be proud of what you have done :)

Absolutely. I think you have done very well and tbh this would not be that difficult to transfer to a css based design. From a sales point of view it works nicely as well. There is no waffle in the text and it tells me exactly what I need to know. Good job.

Ricky55
05-30-2008, 10:54 AM
I did a site using Paypal a while back.

You don't need to code the continue shopping button, that should just be there and when you click on it the paypal window should close and you would be left with your site.

I just think it doesn't work for you site to vanish.

See what I did here

http://www.creativeauto.co.uk/

domedia
05-30-2008, 11:31 AM
Ultimately, I'd like the sites I design to be w3c valid, but I've read in more than one place that it's not all that important, and that a lot of the biggest sites on the Internet are not. Is there a specific reason that a site should be w3c valid, or does it just represent good design in general? Validation is important in development, it will help you find errors and mistakes very easily. I don't think validation is a goal in itself, but a tool to make sure your site works as intended. This is why you'll see many sites with validation warnings.

Ricky55
05-30-2008, 03:38 PM
I agree Dom, I've never heard someone say it doesn't matter, not pro web designers anyway.

domedia
05-30-2008, 05:48 PM
Jeff Croft (http://www.jeffcroft.com), a designer at BlueFlavor (http://www.blueflavor.com), had some interesting thoughts about validation (http://boagworld.com/podcast/116/) a couple of months ago in an interview on the Boagworld (http://www.boagworld.com) podcast.

Interstellar Icon
06-04-2008, 06:18 AM
Hey All,

Thanks again for all of your input - I sincerely appreciate it. Some more thoughts on your thoughts...

I did a site using Paypal a while back.

You don't need to code the continue shopping button, that should just be there and when you click on it the paypal window should close and you would be left with your site.

I just think it doesn't work for you site to vanish.

See what I did here

http://www.creativeauto.co.uk/

Yep...that's the way I've seen it since I redesigned the site. The original designer must have edited the PayPal code, because in the original design, the 'Continue Shopping' button did nothing. I'll definitely change it.

Validation is important in development, it will help you find errors and mistakes very easily. I don't think validation is a goal in itself, but a tool to make sure your site works as intended. This is why you'll see many sites with validation warnings.

That makes a lot of sense, and I think I'm starting to better understand how and why it's important. I'm wondering if some of the larger sites (i.e. Microsoft, Amazon, etc.) may use some other form of validation, perhaps internal - that would at least explain why they don't validate at w3c. At any rate, it's on my "to do" list for all of my sites, and I appreciate everyone taking the time to explain it to me. :-D

Sam

Interstellar Icon
06-04-2008, 08:26 AM
One more thing I forgot to mention - I had asked a new question in an earlier post, which I think "fell through the cracks":

"One last question: I read in a forum that it's important to include text links at the bottom of web pages (for users whose browsers don't display images), but I've since noticed that most of the bigger sites don't have them, and also that alt text would inform the users of the image links' content. From a "best practices" design standpoint, is it still a good idea to include these links, or are they now redundant?"

If anyone has any thoughts, please send 'em my way. :-D

Thanks,
Sam

domedia
06-04-2008, 01:03 PM
No you don't need them. If you use semantic meaningful HTML, it's redundant.