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Prologue
04-01-2006, 08:58 AM
I am fond of a liquid design type website, I really like how open space can be controlled and filled with content with that type of design. Now the catch is I have never made a fully functioning website before but have read up on dreamweaver and basically know how to use it. This site helps too :D . Anyway the real question is, can a novice create a liquid website without going insane?

Are there any things that should be understood when undertaking such a task? Should I go all html or do CSS and layers, or a hybrid? If it is a hybrid then are there some kind of guidelines that I should follow, such as set the margin in CSS and HTML or the like?

So what do you think, yay or nay on a novice pulling off a liquid design?





The website would be a FAQ and step by step tutorial site (usually picture guided).

dthomsen8
04-02-2006, 01:33 PM
I am fond of a liquid design type website, I really like how open space can be controlled and filled with content with that type of design. Now the catch is I have never made a fully functioning website before but have read up on dreamweaver and basically know how to use it. This site helps too :D . Anyway the real question is, can a novice create a liquid website without going insane?

Are there any things that should be understood when undertaking such a task? Should I go all html or do CSS and layers, or a hybrid? If it is a hybrid then are there some kind of guidelines that I should follow, such as set the margin in CSS and HTML or the like?

So what do you think, yay or nay on a novice pulling off a liquid design?

The website would be a FAQ and step by step tutorial site (usually picture guided).

If you were attempting to copy an existing web site, or doing a design with a graphics tool and copying it, then layers with a tracing image would be appropriate, but difficult for the novice.

However, you seem to be starting from scratch, so I would suggest staying away from layers, or tables converted from layers in Dreamweaver, and using HTML and CSS. Many of us who were using layers, or earlier just tables for layout, are trying to switch to pure HTML/CSS. Why get good at the older technique, and then learn the newer ways? There are plenty of places on the web with two column or three column designs with CSS positioning.

Do a learning web site with just a few pages, before getting carried away with putting content into the basic design. You can publish it with a web hosting company with a starting page other than the usual default name, but with a name that allows you (and us) to see your progress.

Use the Dreamweaver page checking for validity, and then check with www.w3.org to check validity of both HTML (or XHTML) and CSS as you go along. Take heed of the color underlining provided by Dreamweaver, which often warns of syntax errors.

Best wishes!

Prologue
04-02-2006, 04:13 PM
Thanks for the advice. I have another question though, I thought that using tables was the way to layout a page with Html, and pure CSS layout was with layers. Also that there are ways to layout the page using portions of each, like layout the general shape of the site, but instead of having nested tables you would use layers there. Now that you know where I was coming from can you set me straight please?!

Obviously I have more reading to do...

dthomsen8
04-02-2006, 08:14 PM
Thanks for the advice. I have another question though, I thought that using tables was the way to layout a page with Html, and pure CSS layout was with layers. Also that there are ways to layout the page using portions of each, like layout the general shape of the site, but instead of having nested tables you would use layers there. Now that you know where I was coming from can you set me straight please?!

Obviously I have more reading to do... When no other method was available, tables were used for layout. The early HTML versions were developed with the expectiation that tables would be used for just that, tabular information, especially in a scientific publication environment. When developers wanted more control, especially in presenting commercial and political information, tables were readily pressed into service, and are still serving as the basis of many large web sites.

Now CSS provides the developer with a way to do layouts entirely without tables or layers. This is not without difficulties, especially because some browsers (Microsoft IE) do not implement CSS properly, and of course older versions of browsers like Netscape 4 hardly implement it at all.

There are quite a few ways to lay out a web page or entire web site, and you are mentioning at least one or two possibilities. I am saying that the most modern approach will be with CSS for both positioning and styling.

Do some more reading. Poke around on the web, looking at two and three column CSS layouts, fluid or fixed. Remember that you can view the source of any site from the browser. Designs based on frames won't be very informative, but many sites today don't use frames.

Prologue
04-03-2006, 05:04 AM
Gotcha, I see we were talking about the same thing. Looks likeI am on the right track :D .

Thanks for the help and I look forward to getting lots of advice from this forum.

dthomsen8
04-05-2006, 03:26 PM
Gotcha, I see we were talking about the same thing. Looks likeI am on the right track :D .

Thanks for the help and I look forward to getting lots of advice from this forum.

Let us know the URL when you have a published site, and we will review it.