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donaldL
05-12-2005, 12:23 AM
Hi all. Here's my deal:

I built a nice web-page... but it kind of sucks now because it is entirely built in flash. So I have built a simple html text ridden page in dreamweaver. So you have two choices. Everything works fine... you want flash, enter flash. You want HTML, enter HTML. But my problem is this. My so called Web-Optimizer doesn't recognize ANY of the 1000 or so words that are in my INDEX2.Html page. Why is this?
Does it need to be "dynamic" or something? What is it that I'm missing here? Or should it be a hidden page in the INDEX.html but I know Search Engines hate that. How On Earth Do I Get This Second INDEX2.Html to work.

I'm sure this is a simple answer. Thanks so much for responding. Don

domedia
05-12-2005, 12:39 PM
URL?
Also I'm not sure what you mean by 'Web Optimizer'.

kate
05-12-2005, 08:16 PM
Hya domedia,

Weboptimiser offers a complete, strategic pay per click service. From intelligent search term analysis to dedicated, hand-optimised bid management and ROI reporting, our search engine optimisation credentials and provider-trained engineers can dramatically reduce your cost of customer acquisition and raise your conversion rates without necessarily increasing your PPC budget.

:D

kate
05-12-2005, 08:19 PM
Hi all. Here's my deal:

I built a nice web-page... but it kind of sucks now because it is entirely built in flash. So I have built a simple html text ridden page in dreamweaver. So you have two choices. Everything works fine... you want flash, enter flash. You want HTML, enter HTML. But my problem is this. My so called Web-Optimizer doesn't recognize ANY of the 1000 or so words that are in my INDEX2.Html page. Why is this?
Does it need to be "dynamic" or something? What is it that I'm missing here? Or should it be a hidden page in the INDEX.html but I know Search Engines hate that. How On Earth Do I Get This Second INDEX2.Html to work.

I'm sure this is a simple answer. Thanks so much for responding. Don
Absolute paths provide the complete URL of the linked document, including the protocol to use (usually http:// for web pages). For example, http://www.macromedia.com/support/dreamweaver/contents.html ('http://www.macromedia.com/support/dreamweaver/contents.html') is an absolute path.

You must use an absolute path to link to a document on another server. While you can also use absolute-path links for local links (to documents in the same site), that approach is discouraged—if you move the site to another domain, all of your local absolute-path links will break. Using relative paths for local links also provides greater flexibility if you need to move files within your site.

Note: When inserting images (not links): if you use an absolute path to an image that resides on a remote server and is not available on the local hard drive, you will not be able to view the image in your document window. Instead, you must preview the document in a browser to see it. If possible, use document or site root-relative paths for images.